Frequently asked questions

We regularly receive questions about ADI powders from the reloading community, and we've noticed that the same issues keep cropping up. Here is a current list of those questions and answers. Of course, please feel free to contact us at reload.support@adi-powders.com.au if these FAQs do not fully address any questions you may have.

I've heard that ADI exports a large amount of powder to the US. Is this why it is sometimes difficult to find a specific ADI powder in my local gunshop?

No. We do not supply the US market ahead of the Australian market, and our American business doesn't exist at the expense of our local customers. In fact, Australian reloaders benefit from our relationship with our US importer, the Hodgdon Powder Company, in a couple of important ways. First, we share reloading data and technical information with Hodgdon, which helps keep our products at the cutting edge of performance and quality. Second, the sizeable volumes of Aussie-made powder we export to the US help keep local manufacture economically viable. Without this export market, the cost of our powders would be much higher than it currently is – it's as simple as that.

Why can't I find a specific type of powder even though my gunshop has good stock of other ADI powders?

From time to time demand for a particular powder temporarily exceeds the forecast we have for it in our system. While we keep a buffer stock of all types of propellant, it is possible for a us to temporarily run out of stock. When this happens, the situation is often made worse by “panic buying” where any powder of the type that is in short supply is bought up by shooters worried they will not have enough to continue their reloading. Due to the complex nature of the production processes, we need about six months from when we decide that more of a type of powder is needed until it is packed and ready to ship.

We have not stopped producing any of the powders listed on our website and in our reloading guide, and our aim is to ensure 100% availability of all of our powder types at all times. Unfortunately, we cannot always achieve this due to operational issues or fluctuations in demand. Please visit www.adi-powders.com for the most recent updates on any issues affecting the production of ADI powders.

I've heard many of the Hodgdon powders are actually ADI powders. If so why are they cheaper to purchase in the US?

One of the first things to note is that powder is typically sold in one-pound jars in the US, and that one pound is 453.6 grams. Australian reloaders buying 500 gram jars are therefore getting 10% more powder per jar than in the US. Further, ADI Powders does not control the retail price of our powders in Australia. The retail price of powder is determined by the market, and gunshops are free to set the price of powder according to their costs and profit requirements. This brings us neatly to the final factor determining the retail price of powder – the relatively high cost associated with moving powder around Australia in compliance with transport regulations as set by each state. In the US, powder can often be shipped as ordinary freight, while in Australia it has to be moved by a licensed carrier of dangerous goods. The cost of compliance with these requirements is probably the largest single factor determining the retail price of our powder in Australia.

Why is it sometimes difficult to get 4kg containers of ADI Powders?

ADI Powders continue to be available in 4kg containers, and it is up to gunshops to order these if there is a demand from customers. One possible reason why gunshops may be reluctant to order 4kg containers is that some state regulations on the amount of powder that can be stored on retail premises are becoming more restrictive. If a gunshop orders some 4kg containers and these do not sell quickly, it diminishes their capacity to stock a wider range of powders. To overcome this, we suggest that our customers arrange for 4kg containers to be ordered specifically for them, and agree on a pick-up date with the gunshop. This way, the gunshop owner will have certainty that the container will not sit in storage for a long time, reducing his overall storage capacity.

Where can I buy ADI Powders in Australia?

ADI Powders are distributed throughout Australia by three major distributors; Outdoor Sporting Agencies (OSA), Winchester Australia and NIOA.

Due to its hazard classification, moving propellant around Australia can be challenging but in collaboration with these companies we aim to effectively manage the consistent supply of our products to your local dealerships.

If you would like to locate your local stockist please visit any of the following:

I've heard many of the Hodgdon powders are actually ADI powders, if so why are they cheaper to purchase in the USA?

One of the first things to note is that powder is typically sold in one-pound jars in the USA, and that one pound is 453.6 grams. Australian reloaders buying 500 gram jars are therefore getting 10% more powder per jar than in the USA. Further, ADI Powders do not control the retail price of our powders in Australia. The retail price of powder is determined by the market, and gunshops are free to determine the price of powder according to their costs and profit requirements. This brings us neatly to the final factor determining the retail price of powder - the relatively high cost associated with moving powder around Australia in compliance with transport regulations as set by each state. In the USA, powder can often be shipped as ordinary freight, while in Australia it has to be moved by a licensed carrier of dangerous goods. The cost of compliance with these requirements is probably the largest single factor determining the retail price of our powder in Australia.

Where can I get ADI .223 Rem reloading components?

ADI reloading components are distributed by Winchester Australia. For a list of stockists, please visit www.winchesteraustralia.com.au/buy and select your region.

What is the recommended way to store my powder?

Store smokeless powders in their original containers, which have been approved for that purpose.

Keep in a cool dry place separate from solvents, flammable gases and other combustible materials. Ensure that the storage area selected is free from any possible source of excess heat and is isolated from open flame, hot water heaters, furnaces, chimneys, flue pipes, etc. Avoid storing smokeless powders in areas, which may be heated by the sun or where electrical, electronic or mechanical equipment is operated. Do not allow containers of powder to contact walls of storage areas where the outside wall is exposed to sunlight or any other form of heating. Any such form of heating may result in spontaneous ignition, either immediately or at a later stage, due to accelerated chemical deterioration. An average storage temperature below 25ºC is recommended to obtain a safe shelf life of at least ten years from the date of packing. Increased storage temperature will reduce the safe shelf life significantly - by approximately one third for every 10℃ above 25℃.

How do I know if my powder has gone off?

Check containers of smokeless powders on an annual basis. Chemical deterioration of smokeless powder can be recognised by carefully smelling the contents of the container. Any deterioration produces an acrid, acidic odour quite different from the normal sweet smelling odours of ethanol or ether which are usually present. Rusting of metal surfaces exposed to smokeless powder can also indicate deterioration. If the powder looks or smells bad, dispose of it.

How do I dispose of my old powder?

Deteriorated smokeless powder should be disposed of by carefully burning it in thin layers not more than 10mm deep and in small quantities never more than 500 gram. Chose an isolated location, which should be at least 10 metres from any other combustible material. DO NOT LIGHT THE POWDER DIRECTLY. Always use an ignition train of slow burning combustible material so that you are able to retreat to a safe distance before the powder ignites.

What if my bullet isn’t listed?

If your particular brand of bullet is not listed in our reloading data, you should refer to the data for the bullet that is most similar in structure and design to yours. E.g. A Nosler BT is a lead core spitzer so you can refer to the Speer SP as a guide for your load development.

Why has some data changed over time?

We now include the test bullet used in developing the load data. Bullet design does influence pressure and thus the maximum charge weight.

What is SAAMI and why is it important?

SAAMI is the Sporting Arms & Ammunition Manufacturers Institute. SAAMI create and publish industry standards for safety, interchangeability, reliability and quality. SAAMI specify Maximum Average Pressure (MAP) limits for all popular cartridges. The maximum charge weight is established during a series of test firings for each powder component combination in a particular calibre. NOTE: Velocity does not have any influence over maximum charge weight.

My new powder is a different colour to my last lot?

Some variation within lots is normal and will not affect performance. Powder varies in colour from dark green to grey. All lots released must pass stringent quality and performance tests.

What is a compressed load & is it safe?

Rifle and pistol cases are considered full or at 100% loading density when the powder charge sits at the base of the bullet when the bullet is fully seated. It is possible with some powders and cartridges to increase the powder charge slightly so that when the bullet is seated, it actually compresses the powder slightly. Compression should not be to the extent where it will damage the grains.

I am impressed with your Australian Outback branded ammo, can I please have the build specs?

We receive a lot of great feedback about this ammunition but unfortunately are not able to provide the reload data for this commercial product range. We do have a large number of ADI Propellants that are suitable for these range of calibres, please refer to the load data in your latest ADI Worlds Class Handloaders’ Guide.

I would like a low energy, reduced load – what powder should I use?

Trail Boss is ideal for reduced loads for rifle and pistol. Trail Boss was designed primarily for reduced loads using cast lead projectiles in pistol cartridges. However, Trail Boss offers superb versatility in rifle and pistol cartridges producing reduced loads using cast lead or jacketed projectiles.

There is a general method for load development using Trail Boss propellant for any cartridge and projectile combination.

Find the charge weight of Trail Boss which would fill the case up to the base of the seated projectile. This is the maximum load. Pressures will be below the maximum average pressure limit for the cartridge.

Take 70% of the above maximum charge weight. This is the starting load.

Begin your load development from the starting load and work up until you find the best reduced load for your firearm.

My barrel is a different length to the test barrel, what will this mean?

Barrel length has a significant influence on muzzle velocity. A longer barrel will generally produce a higher velocity and vice versa. Barrel length does not influence barrel pressure, so a maximum load in a long barrel is still the maximum load in a short barrel and vice versa.

I have AR2206H but you only list loads for AR2206. Is the data interchangeable?

AR2206H has a slightly slower burn rate than AR2206. As such AR2206H can be used for loads where AR2206 is listed.

The bullet weight I intend to use is not listed in your data?

Please email us at reload.support@adi-powders.com.au and we will attempt to provide some guidance on charge weights for you to perform your load development with.

I cannot achieve your maximum load in my firearm and components?

Our reloading data is intended to as a guide, differences in components may mean that some loads are not possible with your components. There can be large variations in case volume between manufacturers. The type of bullet selected also has an impact on the COL. Loads should be worked up for the components that you are using.

What’s the best powder for a particular calibre?

Selection of the most appropriate powder varies and usually is based on some compromises with many shooters having a number of different calibre firearms. Many prefer to limit the number of powders they use. As a rule of thumb, a powder which can fill the case and produce acceptable velocity MAY provide more consistent velocity than a powder which only fills 80% of the available case volume. Maximum velocity should not be your primary consideration when developing an accurate and consistent load.

Is Hodgdon propellant the same as ADI propellant?

ADI export a range of propellant to the US market where they are rebranded by Hodgdon Powder Company. We share reloading data and technical information with Hodgdon, which helps keep our products at the cutting edge of performance and quality, also the sizeable volumes of Aussie-made powder we export to the US help keep local manufacture economically viable.

ADI / Hodgdon Propellants Equivilents

ADI Powder Hodgdon / IMR naming
Trail Boss Trail Boss
AR2207 H4198
AR2219 H322
BM2 Benchmark
Bench Mark 8208 8208 XBR
AR2206H H4895
AR2208 Varget
AR2209 H4350
AR2213H / AR2213SC H4831 / H4831SC
AR2217 H1000
AR2225 Retumbo
AR2218 H50BMG